Why Visiting a Dying Friend Isn’t Something You Should Skip

Why Visiting a Dying Friend Isn’t Something You Should Skip

When someone we care about is in pain or grieving, it can be challenging to know what to say or how to soothe them. When an accident occurs, such as when someone breaks their leg, it’s easy to say encouraging words like “you’ll get over this” or “you just need to relax, and you’ll be okay.” Finding the right words becomes more difficult when the stakes are higher, and the possibility of death is real and imminent.

In this post, we’ll discuss why you should pay a visit to a dying friend and what you should consider saying. Read on!

The Importance of Visiting a Dying Friend 

Anyone who has watched someone slowly die will tell you that it is something you never really get used to. The feelings of helplessness and sadness are strong. In addition, it can be challenging to know what to say to the dying person.

But should you visit? Should you bring a gift? Should you say anything?

Of course, you should! 

The dying friend will be glad to see you, and it will show that you haven’t forgotten them. You can also help them by providing someone to talk to, share their fears and worries with, and sometimes provide a listening ear for the family.

Being there for the dying person is a chance for you to say “thank you” for all the times they’ve been there for you. It’s a chance for you to let them know that you care and that you appreciate what they’ve done for you in the past.

Tips on Visitors and What to Say to Someone Who is Dying

Listen

This is the most important thing you can do for a dying friend or for a dying loved one; really listen to them and try to understand what they want to say or what they want to get out. Even if you are having a conversation with a dying person, you can still let them do most of the talking and while they are talking, think of what you can say to them later (or write in a card) that you think they’ll appreciate.

Encourage the Dying Friend

If your dying friend is having trouble coming to terms with mortality, you can encourage them by reminding them that they have had a good life, that they have many friends and relatives who love them, and that they’ve made a difference in the lives of the people that they love and know.

For a person whose life has been rich and fulfilling and who has touched many people’s lives, a peaceful, painless death can be an excellent way to go.

Remember the Good Times

Don’t dwell on the negative things, but focus on the good times and the kind and loving things that your friend has done. That can be a great comfort to a dying person.

Express Gratitude

You can express gratitude to the dying person for all that they have done or for all the things you have learned from them. It’s a simple way to say, “I recognize that you are dying, but I want you to know how much I appreciate what you’ve done for me and for everyone else in my life.”

Ask for Forgiveness

If you have a friend who has done something to hurt you and you have never forgiven them, now is the time. Express your feelings, and if your dying friend is at peace, then you may find that the person is even more willing to listen to you.

Conclusion

You don’t have to be the “fun cheerleader” for the dying person or even try to be the hero. It’s enough just to be there and let them know that you are loved and cared for them. Instead, you can be real and authentic, try just to be the best human being that you can, be the best friend, and offer the best compassion and understanding possible.

Do you have any experience with a dying friend? What do you find is one of the most important things you can do for a dying friend?

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